The Magic of Doing One Thing at a Time

Why is it that between 25 and 50 per cent of people report feeling overwhelmed or burned out at work? It’s not just the number of hours we’re working, but also the fact that we spend too many continuous hours juggling too many things at the same time. What we’ve lost, above all, are stopping points, finish lines and boundaries. Technology has blurred them beyond recognition. Wherever we go, our work follows us, on our digital devices, ever insistent and intrusive. It’s like an itch we can’t resist scratching, even though scratching invariably makes it worse. Tell the truth: Do you answer email during conference calls (and sometimes even during calls with one other person)? Do you bring your laptop to meetings and then pretend you’re taking notes while you surf the net? Do you eat lunch at your desk? Do you make calls while you’re driving, and even send the occasional text, even though you know you shouldn’t? The biggest cost — assuming you don’t crash — is to your productivity. In part, that’s a simple consequence of splitting your attention, so that you’re partially engaged in multiple activities but rarely fully engaged in any one. In part, it’s because when you switch away from a primary task to do something else, you’re increasing the time it takes to finish that task by an average of 25 per cent. But most insidiously, it’s because if you’re always doing something, you’re relentlessly burning down your available reservoir of energy over the course of every day, so you have less available with every passing hour. I know this from my own experience. I get two to three times as much writing accomplished when I focus without interruption for a designated period of time and then take a real break, away from my desk. The best way for an organization to fuel higher productivity and more innovative thinking is to strongly encourage finite periods of absorbed focus, as well as shorter periods of real renewal. If you’re a manager, here are three policies worth promoting:     Read the whole story here:  http://blogs.hbr.org

Comments

  1. says

    So true! One of the most disturbing things to me is internet (who else?): sometimes, in order to concentrate on something I have to read or write very carefully, I change room and go to another one where no computers are available. There’s some sort of addicting mechanism when it comes to the web: I HAVE to check my emails every five minutes and I HAVE to check my facebook page many times during the day. What can we do?

    • says

      Thanks, Gianluca! Some people say being online is like crack cocaine …. ; )

      Similar to what you do, I make it a habit to focus for a few hours every morning first thing on my most important project … with no distractions!

      Have a great evening!

      Best,
      Christine

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